Back at it?

This, starting to write on the blog again, is like getting back to an exercise plan, you just have to start again!  I haven’t done much writing since this late winter/early spring when I was trying to finish my dissertation.  I wrote the last two chapters of my dissertation in about 2.5 months while it took me over 3 YEARS to write the first three chapters!  Now that my fingers have rested up, similar to a marathon runner’s legs resting up after a race, they’re ready to get back to writing.  Also similar to getting back into an exercise routine, this post is going to be short as I build my stamina for writing.  I don’t want to strain or sprain a muscle (finger or brain).  It is my hope to return soon and share some of my thoughts on what I am reading right now.

Just Finished Reading an Amazing Book

from amazon.com

from amazon.com

Like many students, I experienced difficulties when it came to reading and especially spelling.   My parents were great in trying to get me all the help I needed (even requesting that I be tested for learning disabilities).  The assessments did not show I had a problem, but later on was discovered I had a vision issue.  I don’t remember much about how I was learning to read in 1st and 2nd, but I do remember how stressful spelling was for me from 1st grade to 5th grade.  A special, public, thank you to my family for helping me complete the evil Spelling Workbook pages each week and especially to my younger sister who would do the word finds for me.  The spelling patterns never made sense and I don’t think the teachers spent a lot of extra time teaching the patterns, or giving extra practice time in school to overlearn the patterns.  I just remember doing the workbook, usually as homework, writing my words 5xs, and using the spelling word in sentences.  But for many of my friends, spelling was easy for them and they couldn’t understand why I kept missing so many on my tests.

I wish this book was around when I was in school.  Not because Ally and I had the same struggles, we had similar struggles, and because Ally is a character I think the 12 year old Sarah would have liked. The book I’m talking about is Fish in a Tree.  Take a few minutes and go read some of the reviews on Amazon.  I think this should become required reading for anyone in a literacy program, administration program, or special education program.

Ally is a student who thinks she’s dumb because she has a hard time reading and writing and therefore has some struggles in school.  Ally is very artistic and carries a sketchbook around with her.  She calls it the Sketchbook of Impossible Things because to Ally, many of the things she has sketched seem impossible to her because of her hard time with reading.  I’m not going to give much more away because it is such a wonderful story but I will add this.  If you have a hard time reading Patricia Polacco’s Thank You, Mr. Falker, (because you start tearing up) you’re going to LOVE this story.

Please share the title of this book with anyone you know who has struggled with learning, has had thoughts of being dumb or stupid, and with all the teachers you know.  This books needs to be in the hands of many so let’s get the word out and get people reading Fish in a Tree by Lynda Mullaly Hunt.

As a side note, October is Dyslexia Awareness Month and this would be a great read aloud for this month.

The problem with research

Happy Sunday all!  Before you get on your high horse and remind me that I haven’t written anything in a few days I’m counting today as a win.  Why a win?  Because I’m actually writing something and a day of writing is better than a day of not writing, no matter how many days have passed.

Now onto explaining what I mean in today’s title.  Currently I am working on the reading section of my dissertation.  Chapter 2 for me consists of sections on visual perception, kindergarten readiness, readiness assessments, and emergent literacy.  One of the sub-sections under emergent literacy is reading achievement and that is section I’m stuck on right now.  Not that I do not have ideas about reading achievement, but they are my ideas.  There is an unspoken rule about dissertation writing: writers don’t have the authority to have  their own ideas until chapter 5.  This means I’m trying to find research articles explaining what reading achievement is, how it is measured, and why it is important.  If any of you out in reader land have thoughts or ideas of search terms, please let me know.  I would really like to be done with this section by the end of the month.  Thanks and talk with you later this week.

And as I wrote about earlier–let me know if you spot any grammar issues.